Cases

SLA: Strengthening biodiversity and local microclimate

Al Fay Park in Abu Dhabi is a paradigm shift in how to design and implement nature-based solutions and biodiversity in the dense megacities of the Middle East.

Strengthening biodiversity and local microclimate

Al Fay Park is designed by the Danish nature-based design studio, SLA, and is the Middle East’s first urban biodiversity park. The 27,5000 m2 park is the first of its kind to focus on strengthening the region’s biodiversity while using the new planting and wildlife to enhance the local microclimate as well as the public social realm.

Al Fay Park is specifically designed to provide both biological, environmental and social benefits to the city. The special planting and soil design radically reduces the park’s irrigation by 40% compared to conventional parks. The native vegetation is designed to attract bees, pollinators, birds and animals, providing a lively atmosphere and a guarantee of birdsong – all while providing a lush and green frame for revitalised public life.

The nature-based microclimate design reduces the park’s temperature, air pollution, sand infiltration and traffic noise, providing the best possible social ecosystem for play, sports and leisure, and making Al Fay Park both socially and climatically “the coolest place in town.”

About

The Danish architecture studio SLA creates modern, adaptable cities that inspire community and diversity through innovative use of nature, design, sustainability, and technology. Their projects solve some of today's hardest urban problems while creating genuine amenity values for all. Based in Copenhagen, Aarhus and Oslo the company form a multidisciplinary architectural lab that constantly strives to challenge and expand the boundaries of urban space, city planning, and landscape architecture. Drawing on their strong Nordic roots SLA have realized numerous projects in Denmark, Europe, Asia, and Africa.

  • 2,000

    Local plants at Al Fay Park

  • 2020

    Completed

  • 27,500

    m2

  • 40%

    less water consumed compared to traditional parks

Case contributor

SLA

Photo credit: Philip Handforth

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